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Your hair will love it! Number 1 in hair care – BTMS.

 

Short description of BTMS

A plant-derived product, emulsifier, and conditioner, composed of 75% Cetearyl alcohol (a derivative of coconut) and 25% behentrimonium methosulfate (a derivative of rapeseed oil). Solid white flakes with a light odor. An insoluble product which, however, disperses into water and oil. HLB value: 15. Oil-in-water emulsifier. pH: 5 to 7 (in a 2% solution).

INCI : Behentrimonium methosulfate, Cetearyl alcohol

read more: https://www.lesamesfleurs.com/products/emulsifier-conditioner-btms?lang=en

Continue reading Your hair will love it! Number 1 in hair care – BTMS.

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Sodium Coco Sulfate vs. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate – what you need to know

Short description of the SCS

Sodium coco-sulfate, derived from natural coconut oil and palm kern oil. In the needle form, the product is free-flowing and disperses easily in water. Heat is required to fully dissolve the product. It provides good lather, thickening, and conditioning properties. This product is also a replacement for betaines and alkanolamides in personal cleansing products. A unique naturally derived anionic surfactant for the formulation of “natural type” personal cleansing products that are preservative-free.

 

Continue reading Sodium Coco Sulfate vs. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate – what you need to know

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A wonderful mild and nourishing shampoo solid bar

from here: https://greencharmcosmetics.store/products/shampoo-solid-bar-fruits-rouges-for-all-hair-types

 

 

I make my shampoo bars from natural ingredients, that sometimes have strange names: SCI, SLSA, SCS. Wow! Often I am asked about them and in the next posts I’m going to explain, what is what.

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Essential oils in aromatherapy, cosmetology, and cooking. Unique and powerful Chamomile oil. Part 2.

Chamomile – most of us associate this daisy-looking ingredient with tea, but it’s available in essential oil form too.

Chamomile oil comes from the flowers of the chamomile plant, which actually happens to be related to daisies (hence the visual similarities) and is native South and West Europe and North America.

Chamomile plants are available in two different varieties. There’s the Roman Chamomile plant (which is also known as English Chamomile) and the German chamomile plant. Both plants look largely the same, but it actually happens to be the German variation that contains more of the active ingredients, azulene and chamazulene which are responsible for giving chamomile oil a blue tinge.

  • Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile or Anthemis nobilis)

In ancient Rome, Roman Chamomile was used to help soldiers take courage during times of war. Since then, Roman Chamomile essential oil has become popular for its sweet, soothing nature. With a unique, floral scent and chemical components known for their soothing abilities.

  • German chamomile (Matricaria recutita or Chamomilla recutita)
white and yellow flowers in tilt shift lens
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COMMON NAMES

Chamomile (or Camomile), Roman chamomile, English chamomile, Garden chamomile, Ground apple, Low chamomile, Mother’s daisy, Whig plant.

LATIN NAME

Chamaemelum nobile, Anthemis nobilis

BOTANICAL FAMILYA

steraceae

PLANT DETAIL

The plant measures 10-30 cm height. Do not confuse with German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) smaller and known to be rich in azulene and chamazulene, giving a special blue color to the essential oil.

see also: https://www.aromaweb.com/essentialoils/default.asp

open book near retro photo camera and coffee beans indoors
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The use of chamomile oil goes back a long way. In fact, it’s reportedly one of the most ancient medicinal herbs known to mankind.

Its history can be traced right back to the Ancient Egyptians’ time, who dedicated it to their Gods because of its curing properties and used it to fight the fever. Meanwhile, the Romans used it to make medicines, drinks, and incense.

During the Middle Ages, the Chamomile plant was scattered on the floor at public gatherings. This was so that its sweet, crisp, and fruity fragrance would be released when people stepped on it.

white green and pink floral ceramic teacup with white spoon
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If you’ve ever enjoyed a cup of Chamomile tea, you are already familiar with the aroma and sense of calm that chamomile offers. The aroma and sedative effect of the undiluted Roman Chamomile Essential Oil, however, is much more fragrant and powerful.

Roman Chamomile is known to be especially helpful in combating insomnia.

Roman Chamomile Essential Oil is one of the few essential oils that most agree is especially safe to use, well diluted, with children. When diffused, it can help to calm irritable babies and soothe a toddler’s nasty temper tantrums.

Roman Chamomile Oil is also heralded for its anti-inflammatory action. It can be used to help calm inflamed skin and to ease arthritis, headaches, sprains, and muscle aches.

 

bloom blooming blossom blur
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Chamomile essential oil for the skin:

1. Good For Acne And Eczema:

Put an end to the painful conditions of acne with a dab of this oil. Your inflammation and redness vanish, plus you will be able to enjoy scar-free skin. Mix it with Evening Primrose oil for handling the inflammations. It is also a sought after natural antidote for eczema-like skin conditions.

2. Eases Skin Rashes And Scarring:

Mix 3 to 4 drops of Roman chamomile oil with coconut oil and dab it on your skin. This calms any kind of irritation your skin might be experiencing. Along with hydrating and moisturizing your skin, it also adds radiance. It is also known to be effective in healing sunburns. Add a few drops to your bath or do a cold compress with this oil infused water for quicker healing.

3. Makes Skin Young, Moisturized And Blemish-Free:

Get rid of those crow’s feet and dark circles hampering the beauty of your eyes with the regular application of this essential oil. It eases the blemishes and evens the skin tone. It has skin repairing, regenerating, and strengthening properties, which in turn keeps your skin young and refreshing.

 

 

Chamomile essential oil for hair

4. Enriches Your Hair Color And Radiance:

Rinse the hair with a gentle dab of chamomile oil to brighten up the blonde hair instantly. Add a few drops to your henna mixture and apply it for accentuating those natural highlights. A few drops can be applied on to towel dried hair to give your hair a lovely shine.

5. Natural Anti-dandruff Agent:

Chamomile is an effective natural solution for hair lice and dandruff. In addition, it also soothes the irritated scalp. It hydrates the scalp, thus eases the associated irritation and itching.

6. Moisturizes And Softens Hair:

Known for its nerve soothing properties, chamomile oil easily qualifies as wonderful oil to nourish the hair and scalp. It is effective on dry and brittle hair. It retains the moisture level and strengthens the hair from within, leaving behind soft and strong tresses.

 

see also: https://www.healthline.com/health/chamomile-oil#chamomile-varieties

Some interesting facts about chamomile/chamomile oil

  • Chamomile goes by lots of different names – Chamomile (or Camomile), Roman chamomile, English chamomile, garden chamomile, ground apple, low chamomile, mother’s daisy, whig plant, to name but a few…
  • Chamomile means ‘apple of the ground’ in Greek.
  • Chamomile oil is a great hair moisturizer, helping retain hair moisture and strengthen hair from within
  • Chamazulene is an anti-inflammatory that’s only found in chamomile essential oil.
  • Because it’s so gentle, chamomile essential oil is ideal for sensitive skin.

 

 

previous part: https://greencharmlifeblog.com/aromatherapy-miracle-star-anise-oil/

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Essential oils in aromatherapy, cosmetology, and cooking. Miracle Star Anise oil.

Star anise is an evergreen tree which is commonly known as Star anise seed, Badiam, Chinese star anise, Anis de Chine, Anis Étoilé, Anís Estrellado, Aniseed Stars, Anis Étoilé Chinois, Ba Jiao Hui, Anisi Stellati Fructus, Badiane, Badiana, Badiane de Chine, Chinese Anise, Bajiao, Eight-Horned Anise, Illicium, and Eight Horns. Its origin is in Southern China.

 

Botanical Name:

Illicium verum

Country of Origin:

China

Extraction Method:

Steam Distilled

Plant Part:

Seeds

Strength of Aroma:

Medium

Aromatic Scent:

Spicy-sweet characteristic licorice scent

Blends Well With:

Cedarwood, Dill, Sweet Fennel, Lemon, Mandarin, Peppermint and Petitgrain

Cautions:

Star Anise oil is estrogenic and therefore should not be used in pregnancy, breastfeeding, endometriosis, and estrogen-sensitive cancers. We recommend a maximum dilution of 1.75%.

from here: https://www.planttherapy.com/star-anise-essential-oil

directly above shot of dried decoration
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Traditionally, Star Anise oil is used as a herb for its healing properties and numerous health benefits. The seeds of Star anise fruit are sundried and then steam distilled to extract essential oils. The oil is a pale yellow to clear with a strong scent that resembles licorice. It has a thick consistency.

It possesses anti-rheumatic, anti-epileptic, and antiseptic properties, which makes it versatile. It acts as a decongestant, solves digestive problems, and provides sound sleep. It is used as a flavoring agent in various dishes.

Star anise essential oil has constituents such as anisaldehyde, alpha-pinene, camphene, beta-pinene, cis and trans-anethole, acetoanisol, linalool, and safrol.

selective focus photography of star anise on top of wooden surface
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Anise star essential oil is used in aromatherapy to promote peaceful sleep, relieve digestion and is a natural remedy for PMS symptoms.

High fragrant oil is used in the perfumery, cooking, toothpaste, soaps, skin creams, and mouthwashes.

In cookery
Anise seeds can be cooked in bread, cakes, biscuits, fish dishes, soups and curries, and some European dessert and fruit dishes. They flavor confectionery such as dragees in France, and a solitary seed was once the center of the much-loved aniseed ball.

Anise seeds and their oil are used mostly to flavor various alcoholic spirits and liqueurs such as France’s pastis – Pernod, Ricard, anisette – the ouzo of Greece, Turkey’s raki and the array of other eastern Mediterranean countries. Sometimes, particularly in Pernod’s case, most of the anise flavor comes from the Chinese star anise. However, that anise oil is added to these drinks is fairly certain, but the oil is not now allowed to be sold to the public to make their own pastis-type drinks. Often the flavor of aniseed can be given to a dish by adding the spirit or liqueur rather than the seeds, and in France, there are many specialties named ‘Ricard,’ for instance.
The leaves of anise may be used in salads, with vegetables like carrots and fish soups.

Other uses
The French use anise oil, under strict control, to scent pharmaceutical products such as toothpaste, mouthwashes, and syrups. In veterinary practice, seeds have been fed to cows as this apparently helps the production of milk (which has a faint aniseed flavor). Seeds, crushed or whole, can scent potpourris and other household pomanders.

 

To read more:  https://greencharmlifeblog.com/%d1%8d%d1%84%d0%b8%d1%80%d0%bd%d1%8b%d0%b5-%d0%bc%d0%b0%d1%81%d0%bb%d0%b0-%d0%b2-%d0%ba%d0%be%d1%81%d0%bc%d0%b5%d1%82%d0%be%d0%bb%d0%be%d0%b3%d0%b8%d0%b8-%d0%b0%d0%bd%d0%b8%d1%81%d0%be%d0%b2%d0%be/

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Эфирные масла в косметологии. Анисовое масло.

 

Синонимы: анис обыкновенный, сладкий анис, гантус, бадьян.
Латинское название: Pimpinella anisum.
Семейство: зонтичные.
Родина – Малая Азия.
Ареал произрастания – Европа, Азия, Северная Америка, Украина, Россия.
Аромат: сладкий, тёплый, легкий, тягучий.
Химический состав: транс-анетол 80-90%, метилхарвикол 0,5-2%, анисовый
альдегид 0,1-0,4%.
Источник эфирного масла: семена.
Метод получения: паровая дистилляция. Выход эфирного масла – из 35-50
кг сырья 1 кг эфирного масла (2-3% от массы сырья).


Лечебные свойства в косметологии.

Основные: противовоспалительное, антибактериальное,

Дополнительные: обезболивающее

Показания к применению. Дерматология и косметология.


Стареющая кожа, морщины, дряблая кожа, сухая кожа, ожоги.


Противопоказания.


Повышенная свёртываемость крови, непереносимость.

Предостережения.


Детям до 3-х лет не применять накожно, высокие дозировки могут дать нарушение мозгового кровообращения, мышечные парезы. Осторожно применять при язвенной болезни желудка и 12-ти перстной кишки.


Дозировки.


Для достижения лечебного результата оптимальны средние дозировки 3-8
капель на процедуру.
Предельно допустимая концентрация – 2%.
Реакция кожи: от нейтральной до покалывания, легкого жжения 1-2 минуты.


Сочетаемость.


По семейству: зонтичные – кориандр, фенхель.
По химическим компонентам: базилик, фенхель.

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Ароматерапия в дерматологии и косметологии.


Использование ароматических эссенций для косметических целей является наиболее древней из областей применения ароматерапии. И сегодня косметическое использование эфирных масел, ароматической воды и других производных ароматических растений
пользуется всё большей популярностью как у профессионалов, так и у любителей косметологии. Эффективное применение эфирных масел при проблемах кожи обусловлено рядом аспектов: местными и общими свойствами эфирных масел, мягкостью действия, высокими терапевтическими результатами, сочетаемостью с другими методами, процедурами выбора.

white and purple flower plant on brown wooden surface
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Местные свойства эфирных масел наиболее ценны в косметологическом плане, так как позволяют влиять непосредственно на
проблемный очаг. В косметологическом плане проявляют себя свойства: антибактериальные, антисептические, антивирусные, противогрибковые, улучшающие микроциркуляцию крови и лимфы, нормализующие проницаемость сосудистой стенки, антигистаминные,
противовоспалительные, спазмолитические, противоотёчные, местно-обезболивающие, регенерирующие, увлажняющие, нормализующие физиологические свойства кожи, противозудные, расщепляющие жиры, нормализующие тургор кожи, смягчающие рубцовую
ткань, отбеливающие кожу, улучшающие состояние ногтевой пластинки, противоожоговые, разогревающие, тонизирующее кожу, местно-раздражающее.

woman with pink lipstick
Photo by Shiny Diamond on Pexels.com


Общие свойства действуют опосредованно на механизмы формирования, патогенез косметологической проблемы. Наличие общего действия позволяет при грамотном подходе добиться стойкого
эффекта и длительной ремиссии. В косметологии проявляются общие свойства ЭМ:
 биорегулирующее;


 воздействие на нервно-психическую сферу: адаптогенное, седативное, успокаивающее;


 иммуномоделирующее и иммуностимулирующее действие;


 регулирующее уровень гормонов;

 антитоксическое, мочегонное;


 антиоксидантное;


 стимулирующее общее кровообращение.


Мягкость действия выражается в комплиментарности составных компонентов ароматических растений и эфирных масел организму человека, наличием только натуральных компонентов, отсутствием привыкания. В отличие от широко применяемых синтетических веществ, производные ароматерапевтических растений в меньшей степени обладают побочными эффектами. При их использовании случаи сенсибилизации и аллергии наблюдаются в редких случаях.


Высокие терапевтические результаты ароматерапии обусловлены высокой концентрацией в эфирных маслах биологически активных химических компонентов растения и выраженным терапевтическим действием. Например, антибактериальные свойства чайного дерева в 5 раз выше, чем у 96% спирта.

close up of tree against sky
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Эффективность ароматерапии основана на многофункциональности лечебных свойств эфирных масел, в первую очередь их биорегулирующим и адаптационным действием на человеческий организм. Ароматерапия сочетается с другими методами решения косметологических и дерматологических проблем, усиливая эффективность лечебных и профилактических мероприятий. Место ароматерапии в курсе лечения определяет врач-косметолог, дерматолог.

В косметологии эфирные масла используются с помощью процедур выбора: обогащения косметических средств, местного аромамассажа, водного, водноспиртового, масляного лосьонов, компресса, аппликации, туалетной воды, спиртового тоника, холодных и горячих ингаляций, местной и общей ванны, нанесения чистого эфирного масла, приёма внутрь, индивидуальных духов.

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A useful guide to using essential oils in your beauty routine. Part 2.

Are essential oils safe?

Essential oils have been used for medicinal and skincare purposes for thousands of years in many different cultures. Today, essential oils are often used in skin care products to add fragrance or instill aromatherapeutic benefits. Some essential oils have been clinically proven to possess antifungal, antibacterial, antioxidant, and insect-repelling properties. For example, research has shown that tea tree oil, when applied properly, can help treat acne by killing the bacteria that causes it.

 

These natural oils can be rich in antioxidants and contain antibacterial ingredients that protect against skin issues. However, “Most of the components in oils can significantly irritate and damage the skin. Common examples include fragrant ingredients like limonene, citronellol, and eugenol, which are all present in fragrant plant oils. The positives just don’t outweigh the negatives,” says Paula Begoun, the founder of sensitive skincare specialists Paula’s Choice.

 

How essential oils can hurt your skin?

Some components of these oils are indeed beneficial for the skin. For example, many of them are rich sources of potent antioxidants like caffeic acid and rosmarinic acid (among many others). Others contain antibacterial ingredients that protect against visible skin problems related to fungi, yeast, and other topical troublemakers.

Sounds good, right? But in the long run, it’s not good for the skin because most of those compounds can also significantly irritate and damage the skin. Common examples include fragrance ingredients like limonene, citronellol, eugenol, and linalool, all present in many fragrant plant oils. The positives just don’t outweigh the negatives.

Some essential oils for acne-prone skin such as rosemary, lemongrass, thyme, cinnamon, citronella, and tea tree oils do have research showing them to be helpful. But they also cause significant irritation and haven’t proven to be as effective as the gold standard active ingredient for acne, benzoyl peroxide (which research shows can even reduce redness!).

In terms of essential oils for aging skin, none can successfully deal with the appearance of wrinkles, brown spots, loss of firmness, or address the need to exfoliate the skin, especially in comparison to the hundreds of beneficial, non-fragrant plant extracts and vitamins that have no risk of causing irritation.

from here: https://www.paulaschoice.com/expert-advice/skincare-advice/natural-skincare/essential-oils-for-skin.html

It’s important to know which oils are good for the skin and the others that simply aren’t. Ksenia Selivanova and Claudia Felton, founders of Lion/ne skincare consultancy, say: “There are some oils that have been ‘proven’ to take down the inflammation and help blemish-prone skin; a few of these are tea tree oil, rosemary oil, and lemongrass.”

“However, we would not recommend these essential oils as a ‘go-to’ due to their volatility and potential to cause more harm than good to the skin. If you do choose to use tea tree oil, make sure not to apply directly on an open wound or spot that has been picked!”

 

previous part: https://greencharmlifeblog.com/a-useful-guide-to-using-essential-oils-in-your-beauty-routine-part-1/

 

To be continued…